Sunday, September 25, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, September 04, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Flat Connections - NEW online courses and global projects start September!

Hello global educators!



Let's talk about some upcoming opportunities with Flat Connections. We know many of you are starting your new school year - so consider these global projects and professional learning and share with your PLN.

"How to make online global collaboration work!"
Join the free webinar this week (August 22 USA, August 23, Australia). Julie Lindsay and global educators will share insights into strategies for successful online global collaboration in your classroom. READ MORE and register to receive more details.

Become a Global Educator, Be a Global Leader
Flat Connections online courses that support educators to understand global education, online global collaboration, global digital citizenship and design for global learning have now be redesigned using NEW material from Julie's new book, "The Global Educator: Leveraging technology for collaborative learning and teaching".
Make sure you review the 4-week and 10-week courses available! READ MORE on the Flat Connections website.
Are you an educator in the USA? You can also access Flat Connections courses through the CILC organisation - making registration payments easy!

Flat Connections Global Projects
Don't forget! Flat Connections provides online global collaborative provides for K-12. There are MANY opportunities for students from 5-18 years old to be part of a growing community of global learners.
READ MORE on the website - and plane to join in this year!
Don't forget about the Connect with China Collaborative as well! In conjunction with Mandarin Pathways - starts again September.

Flat Connections BLOG
Read updates, gather ideas and strategies and connect with other global educators.

Questions?
Connect with Julie Lindsay

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Global education: Leading pedagogical change in a flat world


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In an earlier blog post I examined the new globally connected, flat learning environment and how leaders can shape this change to revitalize their schools. This time I will examine the expectations of a global education leader’s ability to think holistically and differently in order to lead pedagogical change. Emerging practices with technology that support collaboration such as sharing, dialogue, and participation, are not new and leaders must demonstrate and model collaborative practices to support pedagogical change. Fullan, Langworthy, and Barber (2014) discuss “new pedagogies” arising from the new learning partnership between and among students and educators when using digital technologies for deeper learning across the globe. Pedagogical capacity, an educator’s repertoire of teaching strategies and partnerships for learning, has and will continue to change as technology becomes more pervasive, such as the emergence of Web 2.0 where learning is organised around the user as a node in the network, rather than around the educator.

 

The outlier global education leader

In an attempt to categorise emerging practices, new labels for global education leaders include the term “outlier.” According to Arteaga (2012) an outlier teacher is a K-12 educator who self-directs to create and develop an innovative pedagogy using emerged or emerging digital social media through collaborative and global open networking. We need to examine the outlier phenomenon as it applies to recent experiences in terms of education leaders who may be identified as outliers, and secondly, education leaders who need to be able to identify outliers in their learning environments in order to positively support them. Global education leadership either needs to emulate or be able to recognize and support this as a vehicle for purposeful professional action leading to ubiquitous learning. This also has implications for recruitment within a learning institution to ensure outliers are included and that innovation in global learning is being supported from within.

What are some new pedagogical approaches?

Flat learning is part of an emerging pedagogical approach enabled by online technologies and has parallels with connected learning, but in many ways goes beyond just connecting.
A global education leader must understand these three essential actions to flatten the learning:
  1. Connect the learning – it is the responsibility of the learner and education leader to connect through their PLN and PLC networks and to understand the consequences of these connections (cultural, social and political)
  2. Build global citizenship practices – a responsible, active learner will be a reliable contributor and collaborator
  3. Collaborate for shared outcomes and solutions – partnerships and new global learning opportunities are a lot closer through the use of emerging technologies
The pillars that make this work are Web 2.0, learning design, leadership and new approaches to pedagogy.
A global education leader has to know how to build virtual and real learning communities – and then blend them! Maybe the “real” (synchronous and face-to-face) is taken for granted…but its definition needs expounding here. It is one thing to build a working and learning internal (to the school or the organization) learning community, but another to then broaden this to include “significant others.” As a generalization, one thing educators traditionally have not been good at is sharing, and once the words “community” and “collaboration” are used it often sends them scuttling back to the classroom. Leadership is paramount in this scenario for building communities online, and cultivating to see them grow and expand.
A global education leader must understand online citizenship modes and behaviours and also model and promote a positive mindset for global connections. Being online as a leader with other learners is an essential requirement here and yes, often there are a myriad of other priorities on the learning landscape vying for time, however leadership = digital = online = citizenship for learning….it’s that simple! Individualistic approaches to Internet use often produce ethical blindspots and “disconnects”.

 

The missing piece?

An even newer concept, “Cosmogogy”, coined by the author of this post, refers to the study of learning while connected to the world by using online technologies, whereby the context of learning is “with” rather than “about.” This puts the learner at the center of the “universe,” a node on the network, with the capability of reaching out and connecting to anything and anyone in order to find information and build understanding, in order to collaborate and to co-create with anyone, anywhere, anytime. It also means learners approach problems and solutions from a more openly networked and in fact global perspective to the point that “unflat” learning feels strange and closed in.
A global education leader knows how to foster and support approaches to learning while connected to others in any part of the world. The leader, most importantly, considers the benefits and advantages of who you work with and what you construct together.

About the Author
Julie Lindsay is a global collaboration consultant, innovator, teacherpreneur and author and is currently a Quality Learning & Teaching Leader (Online), and an adjunct lecturer for the Faculty of Arts and Education, Charles Sturt University in Australia. She is completing an EdD at the University of Southern Queensland with research focusing on online global collaborative educators and pedagogical change. For 15 years she worked as an education leader in digital technology, online learning, and curriculum across Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Her new book, The Global Educator: Leveraging technology for collaborative learning and teaching, published by ISTE, shares many stories, approaches, updated practices, and case studies from K-20 on how to connect, collaborate and co-create, and take learning global. Find out more about Julie through her website and follow her on Twitter @julielindsay.

References

Arteaga, Soraya. Self-directed and transforming outlier classroom teachers as global connectors in experiential learning. (2012): 1-226.

Fullan, Michael, and Maria Langworthy. A rich seam: How new pedagogies find deep learning. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.michaelfullan.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/3897.Rich_Seam_web.pdf

This blog post first appeared on the Pearson Education Blog

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Excited to share - MBR Review of "The Global Educator"


I am excited and gratified to share with readers a review of my new book, 'The Global Educator: Leveraging Technology for Collaborative Learning and Teaching'. This is the first real review I have seen yet.
Reviewer's Bookwatch: August 2016
James A. Cox, Editor-in-Chief
Midwest Book Review
From Margaret's Bookshelf

The Global Educator
Julie Lindsay
ISTE
1530 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 730, Arlington, VA 22209
http://www.iste.org
9781564843722, $39.95, PB, 272pp, www.amazon.com
Synopsis: Julie Lindsay is a global collaboration consultant, innovator, teacherpreneur and author, and she is currently a quality learning and teaching leader (online) and an adjunct lecturer for the Faculty of Arts and Education, Charles Sturt University, Australia. 

"an outstanding work of seminal yet practical scholarship that will prove to be an enduringly useful resource for classroom teachers and school curriculum developers seeking to nurture a global learning experience for children and students"

In "The Global Educator: Leveraging Technology for Collaborative Learning and Teaching", Professor Lindsay illustrates the need for intercultural understanding and collaboration to personalize learning, achieve curriculum objectives and bring the world to our students by answering these key questions: 
  • How imperative is it that educators connect themselves and their classrooms to the world? 
  • What emerging education leadership styles are shifting pedagogy and why should we be taking notice of this? 
  • What are the essential benefits of embedding online global collaboration into the curriculum? 
  • What are simple steps that educators in the classroom can take to become more globally minded and start to change their practice? 
  • How are emerging digital technologies supporting this move to online global learning and collaboration?
In addition to answering these questions, Professor Lindsay provides practical resources and powerful case studies drawn from educators and education leaders in the United States and throughout the world who are forging connections across the globe, embedding these practices into current curriculum objectives and providing their students with invaluable educational experiences

"Thoroughly 'user friendly' in composition, tone, and commentary, "The Global Educator" is unreservedly recommended for academic library Contemporary Education reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists."

Critique: Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "The Global Educator: Leveraging Technology for Collaborative Learning and Teaching" is an outstanding work of seminal yet practical scholarship that will prove to be an enduringly useful resource for classroom teachers and school curriculum developers seeking to nurture a global learning experience for children and students. Thoroughly 'user friendly' in composition, tone, and commentary, "The Global Educator" is unreservedly recommended for academic library Contemporary Education reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists.

Margaret Lane
Reviewer


A big thank you to the many Twitter followers and #theglobaleducator hashtag users who have let me know they have received and are now reading the book! I look forward to your reviews as well.
Don't forget The Global Educator is available as a paper book and an eBook from the ISTE website. The eBook has the full paper book text as well as all 36 case studies in FULL.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Global Education Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Friday, August 12, 2016

Global education: Supporting collaborative learning and teaching


With the near ubiquity of technology enhanced education, new learning environments are emerging. Flat learning, active learning, and place-based learning are modalities that are helping to revitalize schools, and work to the benefit of learners. From an educational leadership standpoint, how does one navigate this new landscape, the new tools, and the learning shifts to thus help educators and students take advantage of this new global education playing field? The answer is multifaceted. First let’s examine the new landscape of flat learning. Then let’s take a look at the influence of digital technology and its role in supporting learning in both local and global communities. Finally, we will explore the role of the leader in place-based learning, active learning models, and more.

Flat learning?

The term “flat” learning applies to a multimodal approach to being connected and learning with and from others in a global capacity. There is no hierarchy of learning as such because all voices are equal, and there is no one dominant group delivering the information to another group. All learners, through access to online technologies, develop an external network and bring the world into their everyday teaching and learning to be able to “learn about the world, with the world,”. This aids the student in working with others in a successful manner at a distance as well as in person.


The role of digital technology

The use of technology promotes transparency and accessibility, for example the “Head of School” is now more accessible. Teachers are using multiple online technologies to brand who they are and what they do in their professional lives, and this practice creates local as well as global connections for daily interactions. A global education leader knows that digital technology is part of the solution in meeting the needs of today’s learners. This same digital technology also supports an individual’s vision and empowers learners through alternative and virtual networking capabilities, using both synchronous and asynchronous communication techniques.

Innovative leadership

A new paradigm for educational leadership is emerging to support place-based learning, connectivism, and global outreach. A learning environment can aspire to have certain flexibility so that all participants consolidate as well as innovate within the community, so that they are able  to break out of the “bubble” that constrains true global independence and collaborative learning.
It is easy to say “visionary” leadership is required to support flat and connected learning modes. In fact, global standards include “vision” as an important attribute, for example, ISTE Standards for Administrators state: “a shared vision for comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformation throughout the organisation.” However, in terms of implementing the vision, we need to question what the best manner is to support students as well as teachers in order to help all learners find their own voice and take charge of their learning. How do we promote a culture of sharing and collaboration and the mindset needed for flat learning that views change and the change process as normal? How do we redefine the role of the teacher AND the role of the student to embrace active as opposed to passive participation in learning?
A global education leader needs to move away from strategic leadership (where only leaders are encouraged to look beyond the organization for information and new knowledge), and move to a more flattened leadership approach. An astute global education leader understands that a flat, connected learning environment has less hierarchy of command, is more agile in approach, and encourages every educator to be looking out for critical information that supports learning.
Leadership actions aligned with these ideas include:
  • Modeling learning fluency while digital
  • Encouraging customization of learning experiences to local standards while being flexible to embrace meaningful connections
  • Supporting innovation and encouraging pedagogical excellence
  • Encouraging an agile curriculum that embraces community interaction and action outcomes
  • Equipping teachers to investigate new global relationships and design solutions
  • Creating opportunities from perceived difficulties
  • Building a culture of success 


Leadership for global learning

As leadership models evolve it is important to understand and share the importance of effective leadership in a connected and collaborative world as a mindset as well as a skill set. This involves a shared responsibility including collaborative planning as a school community to take advantage of global learning. Support must come from within the school for educators who, as global leaders themselves, want to take risks and try new techniques and ideas. Otherwise, serious and lasting change cannot be sustained. Connected learning promotes ownership of the learning pathway, and all stakeholders rely on effective leadership to not stifle creativity and collaboration.
Above all, global education leadership relies on a flattened hierarchical approach for sustained capacity, and a scenario where in fact leaders “get out of the way of the learning” by fostering technology-supported and engaged methods rather than passive learning modes.


Julie Lindsay is a global collaboration consultant, innovator, teacherpreneur and author and is currently a Quality Learning & Teaching Leader (Online), and an adjunct lecturer for the Faculty of Arts and Education, Charles Sturt University in Australia. She is completing an EdD at the University of Southern Queensland with research focusing on online global collaborative educators’ and pedagogical change. For 15 years she worked as an education leader in digital technology, online learning, and curriculum across Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Her new book, The Global Educator: Leveraging technology for collaborative learning and teaching, published by ISTE, shares many stories, approaches, updated practices, and case studies from K-20 on how to connect, collaborate and co-create, and take learning global. Follow Julie Lindsay on Twitter.

This blog post first appeared on the Pearson Education Blog.